R. David Lebel

Assistant Professor of Business Administration

 

Organizations and Entrepreneurship
Office: 
364 Mervis Hall
Phone: 
412-648-1020
Curriculum Vitae: 

Degrees

Ph. D. – Organizational Behavior, University of Pennsylvania, Wharton School of Business
M.S. - Management, University of Pennsylvania, Wharton School of Business
B.S. - Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Wharton School of Business

Profile

David Lebel is an Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Joseph M. Katz School of Business at the University of Pittsburgh.  Dave’s research focuses on proactive behaviors at work including employee voice, innovation, and initiative. His research has appeared in the Academy of Management Review, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, and The Leadership Quarterly.  In his current work, he examines the conditions under which negative emotions such as anger and fear lead employees to speak up or be proactive.  Dave also explores how managers and leaders respond to proactive behavior, influencing both individual and organizational performance.    

Dave is also an award-winning teacher whose teaching interests include organizational behavior, organizational change, and communication at work. Prior to pursuing a Ph.D., he was a management consultant with Deloitte, providing strategy and operations expertise to public sector clients, and was an analyst for a large $15 billion privately held supply chain organization.

Recent Publications

Lebel, R.D.  Moving beyond fight and flight: A contingent model of how the emotional regulation of anger and fear spark proactivity.  Conditionally accepted at the Academy of Management Review.

Lebel, R.D. (2016) Overcoming the fear factor: How perceptions of supervisor openness lead employees to speak up when fearing external threat.  Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 135, 10-21 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.obhdp.2016.05.001 

Rosette, A.S., Mueller, J.S., & Lebel, R.D. (2015).  Are male leaders penalized for seeking help? The Influence of gender and asking behaviors on competence perceptions. The Leadership Quarterly. 26(5), 749-762 doi: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2015.02.001

Awards

BNY Mellon CSR Fellow and Research Grant (2013-2016)

Katz School of Business Excellence in Teaching Award (2012-13, 2014-2015)