Accounting Concentration MBA Courses

BACC 2060—Independent Study in Accounting—variable credits (1.0 minimum)
An independent course of study in accounting may be arranged with a faculty member and a student advisor.
Prerequisites: Special permission/faculty sponsorship is required.
BACC 2251—Forensic Accounting (MAcc Course) —3.0 credits
Fraud is extremely costly to our society, and the costs seem to be growing. The AICPA recently called forensic accounting one of the seven hot, new, "sizzling" career areas in accounting. It is estimated that there will be a shortage of between 25,000 and 50,000 professionals working in this area in the next few years in the U.S., so there are many opportunities for students knowledgeable in fraud to work in various federal agencies (e.g. FBI), major corporations, and professional service firms.
The objectives of the forensics course are to familiarize students with several forms of fraud and the methods that fraud examiners use to prevent and detect it. Students will develop expertise in detecting financial statement fraud from the external auditor perspective, and learn how to use technology to detect fraud. They will acquire a basic understanding of how interviews are conducted in order to detect deception. The class will also provide a historical view of financial statement fraud. The tools used in the class will include interviewing, document examination, and public records searches, which will be helpful to students wanting to become consultants, auditors, tax professionals, managers, etc. The class, of course, includes an ethics component. It will help students to understand the common ethical dilemmas that they might encounter in the business world, and will help prepare them to resist pressure to commit fraud.
Prerequisites: Must have significant previous accounting coursework including an auditing course. See academic advisor for enrollment eligibility.
BACC 2252—Corporate Tax Accounting and Planning (MAcc Course) —3.0 credits
The objective of this course is to help students understand how important features of the Internal Revenue Code influence decisions regarding how to organize and structure business operations and select the most appropriate form of doing business. The course begins with a comparison of the issues surrounding the choice of taxable business entity, comparing the regular corporation (C Corporation), the small business corporation (S Corporation), the partnership, and the sole proprietorship. After this, the course focuses primarily on the C Corporation and the S Corporation and the underlying principles that determine their respective tax bases and resulting tax obligations.
Tax planning is an integral part of the course. Income shifting, tax deductions, tax credits, and income exclusions are discussed in detail. The course uses case studies (including some reflecting an international tax perspective) and tax return preparation to help students to apply the theory and detail of the tax code. Course materials are updated as tax laws change.
Prerequisites: Must have completed BACC 2257 Individual Tax Accounting and Planning, BACC 2537 Taxes and Management Decisions, or comparable course with a grade of B or better.
BACC 2253—International Accounting Issues (Macc Course) —3.0 credits
This course will explore the rapid movement toward a set of internationally consistent financial reporting methods in the global marketplace. The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) and the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) have formally agreed to harmonize reporting standards over time. In addition, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is currently considering a proposed time-line for the adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) in the US. The course will examine the substantive differences between US Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (US GAAP) and IFRS, which have already been adopted by many other countries. The course will also provide a framework for understanding the theory and application of IFRS versus US GAAP and explore some of the ethical issues inherent in international business reporting.
Prerequisites: Must have completed BACC 2401 Financial Accounting with a grade of B+ or better AND EITHER BUSACC 1205 CBA Intermediate Financial Reporting with a grade of B or better OR BACC 2510 and BACC 2511 MBA Intermediate Financial Reporting and Analysis 1 and 2 (1.5 credits each) with a grade of B or better.
BACC 2254—Advanced Financial Accounting (MAcc course)—3.0 credits
This course covers topics that are of particular interest to financial report preparers and auditors. Special emphasis is placed on accounting for business combinations and consolidated financial reporting. Other topics include international accounting, accounting for partnerships, and accounting by fiduciaries.
Prerequisites: Must have completed BACC 2401 Financial Accounting or comparable graduate course with a grade of B+ or better AND EITHER BUSACC 1205 CBA Intermediate Financial Reporting with a grade of B or better OR BACC 2510 and BACC 2511 MBA Intermediate Financial Reporting and Analysis 1 and 2 (1.5 credits each) with a grade of B or better. Please note: this course will follow the official University calendar.
BACC 2258—Strategic Cost Management (MAcc course) - 3.0 credits
The quality, timeliness and credibility of the cost information used in corporate decision-making can have a significant impact on value creation. This is because cost information is important not only in strategy formulation and in the development and implementation of action plans that link strategies to value creation, but also because such data serve as measures of financial performance for products, processes, organizational sub-units and managers. In particular, product and service cost estimates have a major influence on corporate strategic decisions such as pricing, resource allocation, product development, supply chain design and customer focused management. In addition, product costs are informative signals of operational efficiency. Therefore, they constitute financial measures of the success of management actions such as continuous improvement and business process reengineering. Over-aggregate or obsolete cost systems can have a significant adverse impact on cost reduction in particular and overall corporate strategy and competitiveness in general.
The objective of this course is to develop an integrated approach to analyzing these issues. In particular, we will study (a) how product cost measurement affects strategy and resource allocation decisions; (b) how to be sophisticated users of cost feedback and how to understand the strategic distortions that are induced by flaws in cost system design; (c) the strategic role of value-driver information and the relationship between process improvement and cost reduction; (d) the use of budgetary control systems and financial measures in performance evaluation and management and (e) incentive conflicts in organizations and their mitigation through appropriate mechanisms.
Prerequisites: BACC 2401 Financial Accounting. Please note: Due to content overlap, students CANNOT have already completed either BACC 2528 Managerial Accounting or BACC 2549 Strategic Cost Analysis, nor may they register for these courses in subsequent terms, if they elect to register for BACC 2258.
BACC 2401—Financial Accounting—3.0 credits
This course enables students to understand the basic financial accounting model, as well as the structure and substance of a firm's financial reports from a user's point of view. This includes what is (and what is not) included in financial statements, how and when events affect the statements, and what users can infer from these reports. When they finish the course, students should be able to examine a set of financial statements and effectively analyze the firm's financial position, profitability, and cash generating ability.
Prerequisites: None.
BACC 2466 – Risk Management – 1.5 credits
This course will be valuable to MBA and MAcc students interested in working for global businesses, regardless of their desired career paths. As business organizations continue to seek growth in markets outside the United States and Western Europe, they will face increasingly complex and difficult challenges, including compliance with U.S. and foreign criminal and civil laws in places that are corrupt. Compliance with the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which forbids businesses from providing certain benefits to government officials, is essential for global organizations, as penalties are severe. And to succeed in their careers, auditors will need to understand that businesses in certain geographic areas maintain multiple sets of books and hide bribery and tax fraud schemes. Strategic planners and supply-chain professionals will face cross-border risks, including demands by government customs and tax inspectors for bribe payments. Energy executives will confront violence, corruption and supply-chain problems in many oil and gas-producing areas. Sales professionals will confront demands for kickbacks. The course will cover these issues, and will provide students with the knowledge and compliance tools necessary to advance their professional careers in a global economy:
  • why culture and geography matter in business;
  • fraud and corruption issues in emerging economies;
  • why the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Matters;
  • using Transparency International as a tool to assess risk;
  • red flags for international organizations;
  • fraud and corruption issues in mature economies;
  • compliance strategies for global organizations – policies, procedures, training, due diligence, audit;
  • why macro issues of politics and corruption matter to business executives;
  • crisis management;
  • security issues.
Prerequisites: None
BACC 2510 – Intermediate Financial Reporting and Analysis 1 – 1.5 credits
This financial accounting elective is designed for students who have an interest in exploring complex financial reporting issues. Topics covered include asset valuation, revenue recognition issues, fair value accounting, and impairment. This course uses cases to illustrate concepts.
Prerequisites: BACC 2401 Financial Accounting
BACC 2511 – Intermediate Financial Reporting and Analysis 2 – 1.5 credits
This financial accounting elective is designed for students who have an interest in exploring complex financial reporting issues. It is a continuation of BACC 2510 Intermediate Financial Reporting & Analysis I, and includes topics such as accounting and reporting for contingencies, liabilities, leases, pensions, and earnings per share. This course uses cases to illustrate concepts.
Prerequisites: BACC 2510 Intermediate Financial Reporting and Analysis 1
BACC 2525 - Financial Statement Analysis – 3.0 credits
Financial statement analysis focuses on the evaluation of publicly traded company financial statements and related note disclosures as well as the correlation of this historical financial data with the company's stock prices. This course helps students develop a systematic approach to analyzing reported financial data and understanding the underlying risks and possible inconsistencies across companies. Requirements of the course include interim exams and written and oral presentations of analysis.
Prerequisites: Must have completed BACC 2401 Financial Accounting or comparable graduate course with a grade of B+ or better AND EITHER BUSACC 1205 CBA Intermediate Financial Reporting with a grade of B or better OR BACC 2510 and BACC 2511 MBA Intermediate Financial Reporting and Analysis 1 and 2 (1.5 credits each) with a grade of B or better. Please note: this course will follow the official University calendar for breaks.
BACC 2528—Managerial Accounting —1.5 credits
This course introduces students to managerial uses of cost information. Students will use cost information in decision making and understand how cost systems generate product cost information and the strategic impact of weaknesses in cost system design. They will also be introduced to basic planning and budgetary control. Finally, they will explore applications of product costing and decision making in other areas such as marketing and operations. These applications will include topics such as pricing, customer profitability and customer relationship management, the use of cost feedback in process improvement, and value creation through linking process improvement and cost reduction.
Prerequisites: BACC 2401 Financial Accounting Please note: Due to content overlap, students CANNOT have already completed BACC 2258 Strategic Cost Management (MAcc Course), nor may they register for BACC 2258 course in subsequent terms, if they elect to register for BACC 2528..
BACC 2542—Accounting and Finance Law (MAcc course)—3.0 credits
This course aims to provide MAcc and MBA candidates with advanced legal information that is necessary for effectuating management level responsibilities in the contemporary business environment. This course is designed to enhance a business student’s knowledge of the law in a manner that also is strategically consistent with the content of the CPA exam.
Prerequisites: BSEO 2513 Business Law or BSEO 2528 Legal Environment of Business 1
BACC 2543—Tax Policy (MAcc course)—1.5 credits
Our nation was born from a revolution over taxation without representation. Nearly 250 years later, the debate over tax policy continues to dominate political debates and presidential campaigns. Why the tax system attracts all this attention is no mystery. It is the aspect of government that directly affects more people than any other. This course will explore the history of tax policy in the United States, the tax legislative process in Congress, how our tax policies influence people's decisions and behavior, international tax considerations, and ideas for future tax reform. Students will discuss what factors are important in designing a good tax system and survey the social justices and injustices that arise from how the government raises its revenue. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to think critically about our tax system and form opinions grounded in facts and policy. This course is for any student that wants to become a more educated citizen (and voter!) with respect to our nation's ongoing debate over tax reform.
Prerequisites: BACC 2529 Individual Tax Accounting and Planning. Due to the online nature of this course, students are strongly encouraged to bring a laptop computer to class.
BACC 2549—Strategic Cost Analysis (Cross-listed as BQOM 2549)—1.5 credits
This course is a follow-up course to Managerial Accounting. The course takes an integrated approach to value creation, focusing on decision making, performance measurement, and control along the firm's value chain, including procurement, design, production, and customer relationships. The first part of the course analyzes the use of cost information and performance measurement in supply chains. The second part of the course analyzes performance measurement and control systems in various contexts, including target costing, process improvement and cost reduction, and transfer pricing. The course will include an in-depth study of planning and budgetary control systems and control systems such as the Balanced Score Card and Economic Value Added (EVA). The course material will consist of cases, readings, and textbook material.
Prerequisites: BACC 2401 Financial Accounting and BACC 2528 Managerial Accounting or permission of instructor. Please note: Due to content overlap, students CANNOT have already completed BACC 2258 Strategic Cost Management (MAcc course), nor may they register for BACC 2528 in subsequent terms, if they elect to register for BACC/BQOM 2549.
BACC 2557—Accounting Research and Writing—1.5 credits
This course focuses on improving students' writing, deductive reasoning, and problem-solving skills as they conduct research to make a recommendation on the accounting treatment for transactions for which no direct or clear guidance currently exists. Weekly writing assignments are evaluated on both content and the quality of the writing.
Prerequisites: Must have completed BACC 2401 Financial Accounting or comparable graduate course with a grade of B+ or better.
BACC 2558—Not for Profit and Governmental Accounting—3.0 credits
This course focuses on financial reporting and disclosure for not-for-profit and governmental entities based on the standards and principles promulgated by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) and the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB). Students will learn how such entities prepare their financial reports and how to interpret and use such information. The course covers financial reporting for not-for-profit entities, balancing the focus on internal operations with fiduciary responsibility. In addition, the course examines the objectives of financial reporting for governmental units and the preparation and use of the financial statements for such entities. A sample of specific entities will be reviewed to illustrate the preparation and use of their financial statements. In addition, accounting software for governmental transactions will be introduced.
Prerequisites: Must have completed BACC 2401 Financial Accounting or comparable graduate course with a grade of B or better.
BACC 2559—Individual Tax Accounting and Planning—3.0 credits
This course focuses on individual tax return preparation and planning. Students will learn how to calculate the taxes associated with a variety of personal, investment, property, and sole-proprietorship transactions. Concepts will be reinforced through the preparation of actual tax returns that reflect different combinations of such transactions. Students will develop tax planning skills by considering how various transactions can be restructured to minimize the current or future tax liability.
Prerequisites: Must have completed BACC 2401 Financial Accounting or comparable graduate course with a grade of B or better. Please note: this course will follow the official University calendar for fall term breaks.