Operations Management Concentration MBA Courses

BQOM 2139—Six Sigma: Theory and Practice—3.0 credits
BQOM 2139 Six Sigma Theory and Practice has been designed to provide the student with:
  • Strong theoretical knowledge of the Six Sigma Green Belt Body of Knowledge.
  • Practical, hands-on, experience with the Six Sigma methodology.
  • A Katz Six Sigma Green Belt Certificate, for students earning a grade of “B” or better.
Six Sigma is a disciplined, data-driven approach to process improvement aimed at the near-elimination of defects from every product, process, and transaction. Lean topics will be included in this course. Six Sigma utilizes the following five-phase problem solving methodology known by the acronym DMAIC:
  1. Define the projects, the goals, and the deliverables to customers (internal and external). Describe and quantify both the defect and the expected improvement.
  2. Measure the current performance of the process. Validate data to make sure it is credible and set the baseline.
  3. Analyze and determine the root cause(s) of the defects. Narrow the causal factors to the vital few.
  4. Improve the process to eliminate defects. Optimize the vital few and their interrelationships.
  5. Control the performance of the process. Lock down the gains.
To integrate theory and practice, students will be grouped in teams and work under the mentorship of a Six Sigma Black Belt on an industry client field project. Please note: students will be required to visit the client site multiple times throughout the term to gather data and/or present findings.
Prerequisites: BQOM 2401 Statistical Analysis
BQOM 2060—Independent Study in Quantitative Methods—variable credits (1.0 minimum)
An independent course of study in management science and operations management may be arranged with a faculty member and a student advisor.
Prerequisites: Special permission/faculty sponsorship is required.
BQOM 2061—Independent Study in Operations Management—variable credits (1.0 minimum)
An independent course of study in operations management may be arranged with a faculty member and a student advisor.
Prerequisites: Special permission/faculty sponsorship is required.
BQOM 2401—Statistical Analysis: Uncertainty, Prediction, and Quality Improvement—3 credits
This course provides students with a set of integrated statistical tools and methodologies useful in a managerial environment. The emphasis is on the use of real data for modeling and solving problems in the areas of marketing, finance, human resources, and operations management. Topics covered include data analysis and modeling, simple and multiple regression (estimation, testing, and prediction), analysis and design of experiments, nonparametric statistics, and statistical quality control.
Prerequisites: None.
BQOM 2421—Decision Technologies in Manufacturing and Operations Management—1.5 credits
This course provides a foundation in the use of decision technologies for solving complex management problems in a variety of functional areas. Over the past decade, the use of computers and the availability of spread sheet-based software have changed the way businesses analyze and evaluate decision alternatives. This course is a combination of management-science/operations research (MS/OR) and operations management (OM) techniques.
The objective of this course is to introduce two major MS/OR methodologies, namely, Linear Programming and Simulation, with emphasis on applications. Other topics covered include: Network models including CPM/PERT, Inventory Models, Queueing Systems and Decision Analysis using decision trees.
Prerequisites: BQOM 2401 Statistical Analysis
BQOM 2516—Project Management—1.5 credits
Project management is a term-oriented planning tool that makes use of computer software to support the planning and coordination of a project or projects. It is one of the most powerful planning tools that can be used in today's business environment. In the course, we introduce the basic concepts of project management and demonstrate the utilization of these concepts utilizing Microsoft Project. Special emphasis will be given to the application of decision technologies in scheduling, in allocating resources, in speeding up a project, and in dealing with risk.
Prerequisite: BQOM 242- Decision Technologies or permission of instructor.
BQOM 2521—Decision Making in a Complex Environment—1.5 credits
Learn how to make high-impact decisions that are reasoned, defensible, and will lead to having greater success in both making these decisions and in justifying them by individuals and organizations. Most complex decisions involve many interested parties with conflicting interest and objectives and many factors, especially intangible ones like social, environmental and political influences alongside economic ones. All these factors need to be prioritized and integrated under common goals. Such complex decisions have benefits, opportunities, costs and risks that need to be addressed. How to put this together to make the most effective decision is the object of this class on the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and its generalization to dependence and feedback, the Analytic Network Process (ANP). The subject provides a new way of thinking about decision problems. Students will be exposed to a variety of applications and will get hands-on practice with the very usable Super Decisions Software that facilitates this way of decision-making. You are urged to bring your own laptop computer to this course and you will receive a copy of the software.
Prerequisites: None.
BQOM 2523—Process Engineering—1.5 credits
This course studies the design and engineering of the business processes - the way businesses organize “work” in service as well as manufacturing operations. The interrelationships among design parameters, market/demand variability, and performance measures will be studied. The principles learnt here are critical in engineering and/or reengineering of the business processes in supply chains.

Prerequisites: BQOM 2401 Statistical Analysis and BQOM 2421 Decision Technologies. Note: This course and BQOM 2421 Decision Technologies may be taken concurrently.

BQOM 2524—Production Management and Process Improvement—1.5 credits
This course is concerned with the continuous improvement principles involved in the production of goods and services. We provide procedures for an efficient management of the flow of materials within an organization characterized by multiple products and uncertain demand conditions. The examples discussed relate to manufacturing context as well as to service supply chains.
Prerequisites: BQOM 2523 Process Engineering.
BQOM 2530—Distribution Networks—1.5 credits
Distribution Networks is the first of a two-part course sequence in the domain of supply chains that focuses on critical issues associated with multi-facility supply and demand network management, and discusses not just its underlying tactical and operational aspects but also touches upon its strategic implications. The course emphasizes the creation and maintenance of value in the supply network, an activity critical to the survival of all organizations. Value creation can be accomplished by increasing revenue (e.g. by making the delivery system more flexible and responsive to the customer) and/or by decreasing cost (e.g., by eliminating unnecessary activities and efficiently managing the others, from the distribution channel). The topics covered include network design and location logistics decisions, alternative distribution models, hierarchical network planning, and managing supply and demand. Using case studies and software packages, we examine the intricacies of demand network management and the underlying tools, methodologies, and decision support systems.
Prerequisites: BQOM 2421 - Decision Technologies.
BQOM 2533—Global Supply Chain Management—3 credits
This course will consider multi-facility supply and demand network management from all three perspectives: operational, tactical and strategic. We will emphasize the creation and maintenance of value in the supply network, an activity critical to the survival of all organizations. Value creation can be accomplished by increasing revenue (e.g., by making the delivery system more flexible and responsive to the customer) and/or by decreasing cost (e.g., by eliminating unnecessary activities, and efficiently managing the others, from the distribution channel). Topics covered will include those in the shorter version of the course but in more detail. In addition, network design in uncertain situations, inter-organizational partnerships for effective inventory control, and revenue management will be covered. Using real-life case studies and software packages, we will examine these intricacies of supply and demand network management, learning about the underlying tools, methodologies and decision support systems. A laptop is required for this course.
Prerequisites: BQOM 2401 Statistical Analysis and BQOM 2421 Decision Technologies . Note: This course and BQOM 2421 Decision Technologies may be taken concurrently.
BQOM 2534—Strategic Procurement and Sourcing Management—1.5 credits
The course provides a special emphasis on the development and management of strategic sourcing relationships and promotes an understanding of the strategic role of supply management in effective supply/demand/value chain operations. Purchasing and supply management play an essential role in the ability of the firm to operate efficiently and be competitive in the contemporary global business environment. Included in these processes are activities involved in identifying potential suppliers, creating relationships with selected suppliers, obtaining the needed materials in the most efficient quantities at the highest quality levels, and developing strategies designed to ensure an uninterrupted flow of goods and materials. The objective of this course is to make students aware of the demands placed upon purchasing professionals, and to understand the impact of purchasing on the competitive success and profitability of the firm. They must also have an understanding of legal and ethical considerations which affect purchasing decision-making.
Prerequisites: None
BQOM 2537—Forecasting—1.5 credits
This is a short course in forecasting methodologies and their applications in business. This course will cover traditional forecasting methodologies along with an overview of the state-of-the-art of forecasting with methodologies ranging from judgmental to statistical knowledge sources. Forecasting should not be confused with planning. The former is about what the future will be, while the latter deals with what the future should be. Most statistical packages (e.g., Statgraphics, SPSS, SAS) have some modules to do forecasting, but the user needs to know the principles of the models to use them. Dedicated forecasting packages provide some advice to the user about the forecasting method they should use (e.g., ForecastX, Forecast Pro). This course will focus on forecasting methodologies using statistical knowledge. By the end of the course students should know how to collect data and analyze them with a suitable computer program, and ultimately generate forecasts by selecting and fitting an appropriate model. We will also discuss some of the managerial issues surrounding the use of forecasting models in business. The student will select an area of interest (e.g., finance, marketing, operations, accounting, general planning) within which he/she would like to apply and some of the forecasting methodologies we study, and develop a forecasting model.
Prerequisites: BQOM 2401 Statistical Analysis.
BQOM 2546—Project Management Fundamentals and Analytics—1.5 credits
This course introduces the basic concepts of project management and demonstrates the utilization of these concepts utilizing Microsoft Project and other software. Special emphasis is given to the application of decision technologies and analytical methods in initiating a project, in scheduling, in allocating resources, in speeding up a project, in dealing with risk, and in monitoring and controlling a project.
Prerequisites: BQOM 2421 Decision Technologies or permission of instructor. Note: This course and BQOM 2421 Decision Technologies may be taken concurrently.
BQOM 2549—Strategic Cost Analysis (Cross-listed as BACC 2549)—1.5 credits
This course is a follow-up course to Managerial Accounting. The course takes an integrated approach to value creation, focusing on decision making, performance measurement and control along the firm’s value chain, including procurement, design, production and customer relationships. The first part of the course analyzes the use of cost information and performance measurement in supply chains. The second part of the course analyzes performance measurement and control systems in various contexts, including target costing, process improvement and cost reduction, and transfer pricing. The course will include an in-depth study of planning and budgetary control systems and control systems such as the Balanced Score Card and Economic Value Added (EVA). The course material will consist of cases, readings, and text book material.
Prerequisites: BACC 2401 Financial Accounting and BACC 2528 Managerial Accounting or permission of instructor.
BQOM 2578—Data Mining—3 credits
Data mining is the process of extracting useful information and knowledge from a set of data. Mining is typically done on data sets too large to be analyzed by hand, but the same techniques are applicable to small, complex data. This course is an introduction to the most popular methods used in managerial data mining, and provides you with experience in using commercial software to explore real data sets. Models considered include those from statistics, machine learning, and artificial intelligence, such as discriminate analysis, logistic regression, clustering, neural nets, tree/rule induction, and association rule modeling. This course is methods oriented, as opposed to being methodology oriented, so you'll learn about when and how to use techniques and how to interpret their output rather than the details about how those techniques work. A laptop computer is required.
Prerequisites: BQOM 2401 Statistical Analysis.
BQOM 2700—Supply/Value Chain Management Project—1.5 credits
This project course is an opportunity for students to apply their management skills and develop their understanding of the challenges of supply/value chain management. In this course a select group of students will work closely with a faculty member to create a specific deliverable that meets the needs of a client organization. This course allows students to engage in experiential learning through a project course that specializes in a topic that may touch one or several of these areas: supply chain management, value chain management, supplier diversity and global sourcing
Prerequisites: BQOM 2533 Supply Chain Management.
BQOM 2904—Problem Solving and Creativity—1.5 credits
This class is about exposing students to creative ideas and creative people and encouraging them to try a number of creativity methods to enhance their own creativity through study and practice. Many people think that creativity is only about highly intelligent people generating many ideas. We are all creative and just need to have average intelligence to develop this talent. We need to supplement our thinking with innovation, problem solving, and a critical review process. Having a focus, a sense of humor with minimum inhibition but with the responsibility to improve, is a key part of the creative process. We need to learn to improve and change those approaches that have been thought to be the confirmed style of doing things. We need to learn about brainstorming, synectics, morphological analysis and lateral thinking to improve our approach to creativity.
Prerequisites: None.